Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 307
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 307
 
 
Edward Young. (1683–1765) (continued)
 
3301
    Procrastination is the thief of time.
          Night Thoughts. Night i. Line 393.
3302
    At thirty, man suspects himself a fool;
Knows it at forty, and reforms his plan.
          Night Thoughts. Night i. Line 417.
3303
    All men think all men mortal but themselves.
          Night Thoughts. Night i. Line 424.
3304
    He mourns the dead who lives as they desire.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 24.
3305
    And what its worth, ask death-beds; they can tell.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 51.
3306
    Thy purpose firm is equal to the deed:
Who does the best his circumstance allows
Does well, acts nobly; angels could no more.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 90.
3307
    “I ’ve lost a day!”—the prince who nobly cried,
Had been an emperor without his crown. 1
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 99.
3308
    Ah, how unjust to Nature and himself
Is thoughtless, thankless, inconsistent man!
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 112.
3309
    The spirit walks of every day deceased.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 180.
3310
    Time flies, death urges, knells call, Heaven invites,
Hell threatens.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 292.
3311
    Whose yesterdays look backwards with a smile.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 334.
3312
    ’T is greatly wise to talk with our past hours,
And ask them what report they bore to heaven.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 376.
3313
    Thoughts shut up want air,
And spoil, like bales unopen’d to the sun.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 466.
3314
    How blessings brighten as they take their flight!
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 602.
3315
    The chamber where the good man meets his fate
Is privileg’d beyond the common walk
Of virtuous life, quite in the verge of heaven.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 633.
3316
    A death-bed ’s a detector of the heart.
          Night Thoughts. Night ii. Line 641.
 
Note 1.
Suetonius says of the Emperor Titus: “Once at supper, reflecting that he had done nothing for any that day, he broke out into that memorable and justly admired saying, ‘My friends, I have lost a day!’”—Suetonius: Lives of the Twelve Cæsars. (Translation by Alexander Thomson.) [back]
 

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