Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 292
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 292
 
 
Jonathan Swift. (1667–1745) (continued)
 
3147
    If Heaven had looked upon riches to be a valuable thing, it would not have given them to such a scoundrel.
          Letter to Miss Vanbromrigh, Aug. 12, 1720.
3148
    Not die here in a rage, like a poisoned rat in a hole.
          Letter to Bolingbroke, March 21, 1729.
3149
    A penny for your thoughts. 1
          Introduction to Polite Conversation.
3150
    Do you think I was born in a wood to be afraid of an owl?
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3151
    The sight of you is good for sore eyes.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3152
    ’T is as cheap sitting as standing.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3153
    I hate nobody: I am in charity with the world.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3154
    I won’t quarrel with my bread and butter.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3155
    She ’s no chicken; she ’s on the wrong side of thirty, if she be a day.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3156
    She looks as if butter wou’dn’t melt in her mouth. 2
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3157
    If it had been a bear it would have bit you.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3158
    She wears her clothes as if they were thrown on with a pitchfork.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3159
    I mean you lie—under a mistake. 3
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3160
    Lord M. What religion is he of?
Lord Sp. Why, he is an Anythingarian.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue i.
3161
    He was a bold man that first eat an oyster.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue ii.
3162
    That is as well said as if I had said it myself.
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue ii.
3163
    You must take the will for the deed. 4
          Polite Conversation. Dialogue ii.
 
Note 1.
See Heywood, Quotation 92. [back]
Note 2.
See Heywood, Quotation 55. [back]
Note 3.
You lie—under a mistake.—Percy Bysshe Shelley: Magico Prodigioso, scene 1 (a translation of Calderon). [back]
Note 4.
The will for deed I doe accept.—Du Bartas: Divine Weeks and Works, third day, week ii. part 2.

The will for the deed.—Colley Cibber: The Rival Fools, act iii. [back]
 

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