Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 240
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 240
 
 
John Milton. (1608–1674) (continued)
 
2658
    Then purg’d with euphrasy and rue
The visual nerve, for he had much to see.
          Paradise Lost. Book xi. Line 414.
2659
    Moping melancholy
And moon-struck madness.
          Paradise Lost. Book xi. Line 485.
2660
    And over them triumphant Death his dart
Shook, but delay’d to strike, though oft invok’d.
          Paradise Lost. Book xi. Line 491.
2661
    So may’st thou live, till like ripe fruit thou drop
Into thy mother’s lap.
          Paradise Lost. Book xi. Line 535.
2662
    Nor love thy life, nor hate; but what thou liv’st
Live well: how long or short permit to heaven. 1
          Paradise Lost. Book xi. Line 553.
2663
    A bevy of fair women.
          Paradise Lost. Book xi. Line 582.
2664
    The brazen throat of war.
          Paradise Lost. Book xi. Line 713.
2665
    Some natural tears they dropp’d, but wip’d them soon;
The world was all before them, where to choose
Their place of rest, and Providence their guide.
They hand in hand, with wand’ring steps and slow,
Through Eden took their solitary way.
          Paradise Lost. Book xii. Line 645.
2666
    Beauty stands
In the admiration only of weak minds
Led captive.
          Paradise Regained. Book ii. Line 220.
2667
    Rocks whereon greatest men have oftest wreck’d.
          Paradise Regained. Book ii. Line 228.
2668
    Of whom to be disprais’d were no small praise.
          Paradise Regained. Book iii. Line 56.
2669
    Elephants endors’d with towers.
          Paradise Regained. Book iii. Line 329.
2670
    Syene, and where the shadow both way falls,
Meroe, Nilotic isle.
          Paradise Regained. Book iv. Line 70.
2671
    Dusk faces with white silken turbans wreath’d.
          Paradise Regained. Book iv. Line 76.
 
Note 1.
Summum nec metuas diem, nec optes (Neither fear nor wish for your last day).—Martial: lib. x. epigram 47, line 13. [back]
 

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