Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 187
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 187
 
 
Robert Burton. (1577–1640) (continued)
 
2119
    Carcasses bleed at the sight of the murderer.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 1, Memb. 2, Subsect. 5.
2120
    Every man hath a good and a bad angel attending on him in particular, all his life long. 1
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 1, Subsect. 2.
2121
    [Witches] steal young children out of their cradles, ministerio dæmonum, and put deformed in their rooms, which we call changelings.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 1, Subsect. 3.
2122
    Can build castles in the air. 2
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 1, Subsect. 3.
2123
    Joh. Mayor, in the first book of his “History of Scotland,” contends much for the wholesomeness of oaten bread; it was objected to him, then living at Paris, that his countrymen fed on oats and base grain…. And yet Wecker out of Galen calls it horse-meat, and fitter juments than men to feed on. 3
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 2, Subsect. 1.
2124
    Cookery is become an art, a noble science; cooks are gentlemen.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 2, Subsect. 2.
2125
    As much valour is to be found in feasting as in fighting, and some of our city captains and carpet knights will make this good, and prove it. 4
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 2, Subsect. 2.
2126
    No rule is so general, which admits not some exception. 5
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 2, Subsect. 3.
2127
    Idleness is an appendix to nobility.
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 2, Subsect. 6.
2128
    Why doth one man’s yawning make another yawn?
          Anatomy of Melancholy. Part i. Sect. 2, Memb. 3, Subsect. 2.
 
Note 1.
See Fletcher, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 2.
”Castles in the air,”—Montaigne, Sir Philip Sidney, Massinger, Sir Thomas Browne, Giles Fletcher, George Herbert, Dean Swift, Broome, Fielding, Cibber, Churchill, Shenstone, and Lloyd. [back]
Note 3.
Oats,—a grain which is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people.—Samuel Johnson: Dictionary of the English Language. [back]
Note 4.
Carpet knights are men who are by the prince’s grace and favour made knights at home…. They are called carpet knights because they receive their honours in the court and upon carpets.—Markham: Booke of Honour (1625).

”Carpet knights,”—Du Bartas (ed. 1621), p. 311. [back]
Note 5.
The exception proves the rule. [back]
 

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