Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 104
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 104
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
1187
    She is a woman, therefore may be woo’d;
She is a woman, therefore may be won;
She is Lavinia, therefore must be loved.
What, man! more water glideth by the mill
Than wots the miller of; 1 and easy it is
Of a cut loaf to steal a shive.
          Titus Andronicus. Act ii. Sc. 1.
1188
    The eagle suffers little birds to sing.
          Titus Andronicus. Act iv. Sc. 4.
1189
    The weakest goes to the wall.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 1.
1190
    Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 1.
1191
    An hour before the worshipp’d sun
Peered forth the golden window of the east.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 1.
1192
    As is the bud bit with an envious worm
Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air,
Or dedicate his beauty to the sun.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 1.
1193
    Saint-seducing gold.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 1.
1194
    He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 1.
1195
    One fire burns out another’s burning,
One pain is lessen’d by another’s anguish. 2
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 2.
1196
    That book in many’s eyes doth share the glory
That in gold clasps locks in the golden story.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 3.
1197
    For I am proverb’d with a grandsire phrase.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 4.
1198
    O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you!
She is the fairies’ midwife, and she comes
In shape no bigger than an agate-stone
On the fore-finger of an alderman,
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men’s noses as they lie asleep.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 4.
1199
    Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub,
Time out o’ mind the fairies’ coachmakers.
          Romeo and Juliet. Act i. Sc. 4.
 
Note 1.
See Heywood, Quotation 113. [back]
Note 2.
See Chapman, Quotation 10. [back]
 

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