Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Bidpai
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Bidpai.
 
 
1
    We ought to do our neighbour all the good we can. If you do good, good will be done to you; but if you do evil, the same will be measured back to you again. 1
          Dabschelim and Pilpay. Chap. i.
2
    It has been the providence of Nature to give this creature [the cat] nine lives instead of one. 2
          The Greedy and Ambitious Cat. Fable iii.
3
    There is no gathering the rose without being pricked by the thorns. 3
          The Two Travellers. Chap. ii. Fable vi.
4
    Wise men say that there are three sorts of persons who are wholly deprived of judgment,—they who are ambitious of preferments in the courts of princes; they who make use of poison to show their skill in curing it; and they who intrust women with their secrets.
          The Two Travellers. Chap. ii. Fable vi.
5
    Men are used as they use others.
          The King who became Just. Fable ix.
6
    What is bred in the bone will never come out of the flesh. 4
          The Two Fishermen. Fable xiv.
7
    Guilty consciences always make people cowards. 5
          The Prince and his Minister. Chap. iii. Fable iii.
8
    Whoever … prefers the service of princes before his duty to his Creator, will be sure, early or late, to repent in vain.
          Ibid.
9
    There are some who bear a grudge even to those that do them good.
          A Religious Doctor. Fable vi.
10
    There was once, in a remote part of the East, a man who was altogether void of knowledge and experience, yet presumed to call himself a physician.
          The Ignorant Physician. Fable viii.
  
  
  
11
    He that plants thorns must never expect to gather roses. 6
          The Ignorant Physician. Fable viii.
12
    Honest men esteem and value nothing so much in this world as a real friend. Such a one is as it were another self, to whom we impart our most secret thoughts, who partakes of our joy, and comforts us in our affliction; add to this, that his company is an everlasting pleasure to us.
          Choice of Friends. Chap. iv.
13
    That possession was the strongest tenure of the law. 7
          The Cat and the two Birds. Chap. v. Fable iv.
 
Note 1.
And with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.—Matthew vii. 2. [back]
Note 2.
See Heywood, Quotation 91. [back]
Note 3.
See Herrick, Quotation 17. [back]
Note 4.
See Heywood, Quotation 122. [back]
Note 5.
See Shakespeare, Hamlet, Quotation 109. [back]
Note 6.
See Butler, Quotation 53. [back]
Note 7.
See Cibber, Quotation 13. [back]
 

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