Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Mark (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) Twain
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Mark (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) Twain. (1835–1910)
 
 
1
    This is petrified truth.
          A Complaint about Correspondents.
2
    This poor little one-horse town.
          The Undertaker’s Story.
3
      They spell it Vinci and pronounce it Vinchy; foreigners always spell better than they pronounce.
          The Innocents Abroad.
4
    Conductor, when you receive a fare,
Punch in the presence of the passenjare:
A blue trip slip for an eight-cent fare,
A buff trip slip for a six-cent fare,
A pink trip slip for a three-cent fare,
Punch in the presence of the passenjare!


          Chorus:
Punch, brothers, punch with care!
Punch in the presence of the passenjare.
          Punch, Brothers, punch.
5
    He is now fast rising from affluence to poverty.
          Henry Ward Beecher’s Farm.
6
      Barring that natural expression of villainy which we all have, the man looked honest enough.
          A mysterious Visit.
7
      An experienced, industrious, ambitious, and often quite picturesque liar.
          My military Campaign.
8
      When I’m playful, I use the meridians of longitude and parallels of latitude for a seine, and drag the Atlantic ocean for whales. I scratch my head with the lightning and purr myself to sleep with the thunder.
          Life on the Mississippi.
9
      There is a sumptuous variety about the New England weather that compels the stranger’s admiration—and regret. The weather is always doing something there; always attending strictly to business; always getting up new designs and trying them on people to see how they will go. But it gets through more business in Spring than in any other season. In the Spring I have counted one hundred and thirty-six different kinds of weather inside of twenty-four hours.
          New England Weather (Speech at dinner of New England Society. New York, Dec. 22, 1876.)
10
      Probable nor’-east to sou’-west winds, varying to the southard and westard and eastard and points between; high and low barometer, sweeping round from place to place; probable areas of rain, snow, hail, and drought, succeeded or preceded by earthquakes with thunder and lightning.
          New England Weather (Speech at dinner of New England Society. New York, Dec. 22, 1876.)
 

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