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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Edward Gibbon. (1737–1794)
 
 
1
    The reign of Antoninus is marked by the rare advantage of furnishing very few materials for history, which is indeed little more than the register of the crimes, follies, and misfortunes of mankind. 1
          Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776). Chap. iii.
2
    Revenge is profitable, gratitude is expensive.
          Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776). Chap. xi.
3
    Amiable weaknesses of human nature. 2
          Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776). Chap. xiv.
4
    In every deed of mischief he had a heart to resolve, a head to contrive, and a hand to execute. 3
          Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776). Chap. xlviii.
5
    Our sympathy is cold to the relation of distant misery.
          Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776). Chap. xlix.
6
    The winds and waves are always on the side of the ablest navigators. 4
          Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776). Chap. lxviii.
7
    Vicissitudes of fortune, which spares neither man nor the proudest of his works, which buries empires and cities in a common grave.
          Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776). Chap. lxxi.
8
    All that is human must retrograde if it do not advance.
          Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776). Chap. lxxi.
9
    I saw and loved. 5
          Memoirs. Vol. i. p. 106.
10
    On the approach of spring I withdraw without reluctance from the noisy and extensive scene of crowds without company, and dissipation without pleasure.
          Memoirs. Vol. i. p. 116.
  
  
  
11
    I was never less alone than when by myself. 6
          Memoirs. Vol. i. p. 117.
 
Note 1.
L’histoire n’est que le tableau des crimes et des malheurs (History is but the record of crimes and misfortunes).—Francis M. Voltaire: L’Ingénu, chap. x. [back]
Note 2.
See Fielding, Quotation 16. [back]
Note 3.
See Clarendon, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 4.
On dit que Dieu est toujours pour les gros bataillons (It is said that God is always on the side of the heaviest battalions).—Francis M. Voltaire: Letter to M. le Riche. 1770.

J’ai toujours vu Dieu du coté des gros bataillons (I have always noticed that God is on the side of the heaviest battalions).—De la Ferté to Anne of Austria. [back]
Note 5.
See Chapman, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 6.
Never less alone than when alone.—Samuel Rogers: Human Life. [back]
 

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