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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Richard Bentley. (1662–1742)
 
 
1
    It is a maxim with me that no man was ever written out of reputation but by himself.
          Monk’s Life of Bentley. Page 90.
2
    “Whatever is, is not,” is the maxim of the anarchist, as often as anything comes across him in the shape of a law which he happens not to like. 1
          Declaration of Rights.
3
    The fortuitous or casual concourse of atoms. 2
          Sermons, vii. Works, Vol. iii. p. 147 (1692).
 
Note 1.
See Dryden, Quotation 91. [back]
Note 2.
That fortuitous concourse of atoms.—Review of Sir Robert Peel’s Address. Quarterly Review, vol. liii. p. 270 (1835).

In this article a party was described as a fortuitous concourse of atoms,—a phrase supposed to have been used for the first time many years afterwards by Lord John Russell.—Croker Papers, vol. ii. p. 54. [back]
 

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