Nonfiction > Harvard Classics > William Penn > Fruits of Solitude
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William Penn. (1644–1718).  Fruits of Solitude.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Part I
 
Jealousy
 
 
208. Be not fancifully Jealous: For that is Foolish; as, to be reasonably so, is Wise.  1
  209. He that superfines up another Man’s Actions, cozens himself, as well as injures them.  2
  210. To be very subtil and scrupulous in Business, is as hurtful, as being over-confident and secure.  3
  211. In difficult Cases, such a Temper is Timorous; and in dispatch Irresolute.  4
  212. Experience is a safe Guide: And a Practical Head, is a great Happiness in Business.  5
 

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