Nonfiction > Harvard Classics > William Penn > Fruits of Solitude
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William Penn. (1644–1718).  Fruits of Solitude.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Part I
 
Wit
 
 
168. Wit is an happy and striking way of expressing a Thought.  1
  169. ’T is not often tho’ it be lively and mantling, that it carries a great Body with it.  2
  170. Wit therefore is fitter for Diversion than Business, being more grateful to Fancy than Judgment.  3
  171. Less Judgment than Wit, is more Sale than Ballast.  4
  172. Yet it must be confessed, that Wit gives an Edge to Sense, and recommends it extreamly.  5
  173. Where Judgment has Wit to express it, there’s the best Orator.  6
 

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