Nonfiction > Harvard Classics > William Penn > Fruits of Solitude
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William Penn. (1644–1718).  Fruits of Solitude.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Part I
 
Inquiry
 
 
155. Have a care of Vulgar Errors. Dislike, as well as Allow Reasonably.  1
  156. Inquiry is Human; Blind Obedience Brutal. Truth never loses by the one, but often suffers by the other.  2
  157. The usefulest Truths are plainest: And while we keep to them, our Differences cannot rise high.  3
  158. There may be a Wantonness in Search, as well as a Stupidity in Trusting. It is great Wisdom equally to avoid the Extreams.  4
 

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