Nonfiction > Harvard Classics > William Penn > Fruits of Solitude
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William Penn. (1644–1718).  Fruits of Solitude.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Part I
 
Temper
 
 
142. Nothing does Reason more Right, than the Coolness of those that offer it: For Truth often suffers more by the Heat of its Defenders, than from the Arguments of its Opposers.  1
  143. Zeal ever follows an Appearance of Truth, and the Assured are too apt to be warm; but ’t is their weak side in Argument; Zeal being better shewn against Sin, than Persons or their Mistakes.  2
 

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