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William Penn. (1644–1718).  Fruits of Solitude.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Part I
 
Luxury
 
 
28. Such is now become our Delicacy, that we will not eat ordinary Meat, nor drink small, pall’d 1 Liquor; we must have the best, and the best cook’d for our Bodies, while our Souls feed on empty or corrupted Things.  1
  29. In short, Man is spending all upon a bare House, and hath little or no Furniture within to recommend it; which is preferring the Cabinet before the Jewel, a Lease of seven Years before an Inheritance. So absurd a thing is Man, after all his proud Pretences to Wit and Understanding.  2
 
Note 1. Stale [back]
 

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